Mark

How Do You Know?

In my NameFlash™ name development business, I usually present 30 – 50 names for a company’s product/service, so picking a great name from the assortment of terrific names we present is often a challenge.  Smaller companies usually pick a name and run with it while larger clients often have a series of Management/Board of Director reviews, and sometimes they do consumer research in order to get additional input.

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Code Names Decoded

I have a confession: I love code names! One of the pleasures in my 25+ year marketing career was how I often got to choose the official code name for projects. But instead of sticking with the pseudo-science approach where one picks a scientific term such as “Project Fusion,” I preferred to create “families” of code names that reflected the nature of the innovations. As an example, I once used the names of the Seven Dwarfs as code names for the new items of a line of cold remedy products. Most of them were logical, such as Sleepy for the non-drowsy variant and Doc for the multi-symptom product, but the president of the company got mad when I named his pet project Dopey (it was a really stupid idea). A few weeks later he issued an internal memorandum on the development of code names and introduced the new requirement for top management approval of code names prior to project launch. So much for my code name fun!

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When Should You Change Your Name?

In my NameFlashSM name development business, I sometimes get asked by clients, “Should I change my brand name?” From a purely selfish standpoint my answer should be “YES!” because I get paid to generate names! But the reality is that there are times when you should not change your name, despite the negative impact on my cash flow.

So how do you decide if you need a better name? Here are some tips on when you should or should not change your name.

Consider changing your name when:

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The “Free Pizza” Solution to Name Development

I’ve asked a lot of my advertising agency friends how their agencies would approach name development if a client asked for help in this area. The response, virtually without exception, is that they round up everyone they can at the end of the day, order a couple of pizzas, and hold a big brainstorming session to generate ideas.

In the same vein, some companies consider holding a naming contest to develop names instead of hiring a professional name developer (such as my NameFlashSM name development business). After all, isn’t it important to allow our customers/employees/associates to have input on our new name? And, we could offer a prize of free (insert product name) for a year so it would not cost us anything!

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A Huge Trademark Mistake

One of the unique features of my NameFlash name development process is how I do a trademark screen for the names I am planning to recommend.  I do this trademark search because I want to present names that are available from a trademark standpoint. I also check domain name availability and common law use, because you do not have to register a trademark to own a trademark if you establish use.

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What Is P&G’s “Secret of Seven?”

A few years ago, Procter & Gamble launched the Olay Total Effects line, and introduced us to “Anti aging skin care products that moisturize and fight seven signs of aging.” In case you don’t know, the “seven signs of aging” are “look of fine lines and wrinkles, rough texture, uneven skin tone, surface dullness, appearance of prominent pores, noticeability of age spots, and dryness.”

Interesting. And wouldn’t you know it, Olay Total Effects works on all seven signs of aging (imagine that).

The skeptic in me thought that maybe there were more signs of aging that Olay was not designed to work on, but I let it go, figuring that I was not an expert on skin care.

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Is the iPad Name Going Generic?

Like many professional name developers, I opened 2010 by making fun of the Apple iPad name. Steve Jobs gave a strong case for naming the “tablet pc” in a way that was consistent with previous Apple naming conventions (iPod, iTunes, iPhone), but many of us poked fun at the similarity of the name with feminine hygiene products.

Who’s laughing now?

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It’s All In How You Say It

A tutoring organization, Chyten (www.chyten.com), opened a new location near my home. Chyten tutors kindergarteners through graduate students, and the website looks nice enough—pictures of happy college students sitting cross-legged on the quad, a parent login, news and events…but the question is, how do you pronounce it? 

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When Acronyms Go Bad…or Just Sloppy Naming Work?

Name developers occasionally are asked to develop acronyms for clients. Sometimes acronyms are terrific short cuts that resonate. Who hasn’t heard of MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving)?

Sometimes acronyms are trouble. The CNN article has numerous examples of “bad luck” with unfortunate acronyms (e.g., when your acronym develops a bad meaning). Perhaps some of these acronyms are a result of bad luck…but I believe most of these cases are unfortunate examples of naming sloppiness and bad branding!

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Please contact Mark Prus to begin exploring the possibilities!

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